Our Bold Academic Vision

Effective July 2, UCF will create two new colleges – one focused on health professions and sciences and the other on community innovation and education – and one new interdisciplinary, inter-college school focused on communication and media.

Learn about the new colleges and schools.

Read the Provost’s January announcement.

Submit your questions and comments to provost@ucf.edu.

Resources

Academic Health Sciences Center
Organizational Chart | College Program Listing | Transition Task Force

College of Community Innovation and Education
Urban Innovation and Education Transition Team
Organizational Chart | College Program Listing | Transition Task Force

Nicholson School of Communication and Media
Communication and New Media Transition Team
Organizational Chart | School Program Listing | Transition Task Force

Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions | For Faculty and Staff | For Students

General Questions

  1. Why did UCF decide to realign academic programs and colleges?
    The creation of the UCF Lake Nona Medical Center and a new campus in downtown Orlando presented us two very exciting opportunities to bend the future by reimagining what higher education should look like in the 21st century – and to lead it. This restructuring aligns our strengths in areas of opportunity and organizational changes that will better position our faculty, staff, and students for the future.

  2. How were these decisions made?
    In August, Provost Whittaker charged two task forces to make recommendations that realign our academic units and improve synergies and partnership opportunities in key areas of health care, urban innovation, education, and communication and new media.

    An Academic Health Sciences Center task force was led by Dr. Deborah German, vice president for Medical Affairs and dean of the College of Medicine, and a task force on Urban Innovation and New Media was led by Dr. Thad Seymour, vice provost for UCF Downtown, and Dr. Elizabeth Dooley, vice provost for Teaching and Learning and dean of the College of Undergraduate Studies.

    The task forces provided their recommendations to Provost Whittaker in December, and a final decision was announced to the entire campus community on Jan. 22. The names of the new colleges and the new school that resulted from this process were announced in March.

  3. Who was involved in the decision-making process?
    The task forces included deans and other administrators and key faculty and staff members from the academic areas under consideration for realignment. The task forces convened listening sessions in the fall to ensure the process was inclusive of those who may be impacted and considered a variety of viewpoints and options before forming their recommendations. Once the decision was announced, these task forces also created transition teams to help set up the organizational structures and other changes related to the new colleges and school.

  4. What programs are in the new colleges and the new school?
    A new College of Health Professions and Sciences will help bring together UCF’s strengths in health care education, research, service, and partnerships in an Academic Health Sciences Center with the College of Medicine and the College of Nursing.

    A new College of Community Innovation and Education will include a group of community-facing programs engaged with the social and economic fabric of thriving, modern cities. The new Nicholson School of Communication and Media is an interdisciplinary, inter-college school with communication, digital media, and film programs that will redefine content creation, digital art, and communication for the 21st century.

    These changes will encourage interdisciplinary collaboration and inter-professional experiences to enhance learning and research opportunities.

  5. Are any majors being eliminated?
    No, academic majors and programs will not be eliminated in this realignment.

  6. What do these changes mean for the College of Education and Human Performance and College of Health and Public Affairs?
    These colleges will no longer exist with the new organizational changes. Health-related programs will be realigned with the College of Health Professions and Sciences, and community-facing and education programs will become the new College of Community Innovation and Education. Centers and institutes from these colleges also will be realigned.

  7. When will these changes take place?
    All organizational changes will take effect by July 2, 2018.

  8. What programs and centers will physically move to the UCF Health Sciences Campus at Lake Nona or to UCF Downtown?
    We do not know the dates for when programs associated with the College of Health Professions and Sciences will move to Lake Nona – though we know that none of the programs will move until at least 2020. New facilities still need to be planned and built to accommodate these programs. Among those programs that eventually would relocate include the School of Social Work, Sport and Exercise Science (to be renamed Kinesiology), Physical Therapy, Athletic Training, and Communication Sciences and Disorders, as well as the College of Nursing. The timing and geography will be determined by the transition teams.

    Programs scheduled to move to UCF Downtown for the fall 2019 opening can be found on the new colleges and school program listing. Additional programs will relocate downtown later, but dates haven’t yet been decided.

  9. Who will lead the transition teams between now and July 2, 2018?
    Dr. German will lead the Academic Health Sciences Center transition team. Dr. Pamela “Sissi” Carroll, dean of the College of Education and Human Performance, and Dr. Ross Wolf, an associate dean in the College of Health and Public Affairs, will co-lead the transition team creating the administrative and leadership structure of the new College of Community Innovation and Education, under the guidance of Thad Seymour.

    Dr. Robert Littlefield, director of the Nicholson School of Communication, will lead the transition team for the new Nicholson School of Communication and Media, under Dr. Seymour’s guidance, and Jeff Moore, dean of the College of Arts and Humanities, will serve as chair of the council that will govern the new school.

Faculty/Staff Questions

  1. If I am in a tenure-track position, will the new structure affect my timeline or process?
    These decisions will be addressed by the transition teams for the two new colleges and interdisciplinary school. However, you are still being evaluated on your current department criteria. The new units in the colleges and school will need to develop their own criteria, which will likely happen after they are established on July 2, with the earliest implementation in the 2020-21 academic year.

    If you are applying for promotion and tenure in the 2018-19 academic year, the electronic system will open on July 5, after the new units are established. If you have any questions, contact Faculty Excellence.

  2. Will faculty or staff have the opportunity for input or participation on transition teams?
    Yes, faculty and staff are providing critical input and participation on each of the transition teams, and will continue to do so leading up to and after July 2.

  3. How will this affect college/school/department budgets?
    The transition teams are in the process of determining any impact on budgets in consultation with the appropriate administrative offices.

  4. How will this affect hiring new faculty or staff members between now and when the changes will take effect?
    Each department will continue to operate as is, unless you are directed otherwise by your supervisor. Please check with your department chair or hiring team for any questions about new hires.

  5. What will happen to the buildings on campus currently housing programs that are being realigned?
    Transition teams will work with each program on its geography and phasing of any move. Until otherwise directed, programs will remain in their current space and offices.

  6. Will this impact accreditation for my school or program?
    The goal of these organizational changes is to further strengthen our degree programs and academic units. The transition teams will take program accreditation requirements into consideration throughout the process and work directly with you on any reporting that needs to be made.

Student Questions

  1. If my academic program is one that is moving to a new college…

    1. and I’m graduating in Spring or Summer, what college will grant my degree?
      Your existing college will award your degree at commencement.

    2. and I’m graduating in Fall, what college will grant my degree?
      The new college will award your degree at commencement.

    3. will I start taking classes at UCF Downtown in fall 2019?
      Beginning in August 2019, the following programs will hold classes at the new downtown campus: Public Administration, Urban and Regional Planning, Nonprofit Management, Research Administration, Public Affairs, Emergency Management, Health Management and Informatics, Legal Studies, Communication, and Digital Media, as well as the Florida Interactive Entertainment Academy, which already is based downtown.

      Other programs in the new College of Community Innovation and Education and Nicholson School of Communication and Media will relocate downtown later, but dates haven’t yet been decided – and won’t happen before 2020.

    4. when will I start taking classes at the Health Sciences Campus at Lake Nona?
      We do not know the dates for when programs associated with the Academic Health Sciences Center at Lake Nona will move – though we know that none of the programs will move until at least 2020. New facilities still need to be planned and built to accommodate these programs.

      Among those programs that eventually would relocate include the School of Social Work, Sport and Exercise Science (to be renamed Kinesiology), Physical Therapy, Athletic Training, and Communication Sciences and Disorders, as well as the College of Nursing. The timing and geography will be determined by the transition teams.

      Students designated “Nursing pending” or “Pre-Nursing” and undergraduates in the Health Sciences program will remain at their current location.

  2. Will these changes affect the names of courses?
    Changes to names of courses will be determined by leadership in the new colleges and school. No changes in course names will take place prior to July 2, 2018.

  3. Will my credit hours be accepted by the new college?
    Yes, your current credit hours are unaffected by these changes.

  4. Will degree requirements change?
    Degree requirements (per your catalog year) are not changing, and your earned credit hours will be accepted. Please check your catalog year for specific course requirements.

  5. How does this affect transfer students?
    These changes will have no impact on transfer students who have been accepted to existing UCF colleges or programs. Prospective students and new applicants will apply in the same manner.

  6. Do I have to report to a new advisor?
    No, there are no personnel changes at this time.

  7. As a student, do I need to take any action to ensure I stay on track with my academic program?
    Students do not need to take any action at this time. We encourage you to stay informed about changes to their academic program and check with your department’s advising office if you have further questions.

  8. Will I have to pay more for parking at the other campuses?
    No, your UCF parking permit is valid at UCF Downtown and the UCF Health Sciences Campus at Lake Nona.

  9. Will I incur any additional fees at the other campuses?
    No, student fees will not be affected by these academic realignment changes.

  10. Will students experience any changes with Student Health Services reporting to the Academic Health Sciences Center?
    No, this change will present opportunities to enhance services for students.